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Courses for Spring 2020

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
PHIL 001-001 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY HUMPHREYS, JUSTIN MW 1200PM-0100PM Philosophers ask difficult questions about the most basic issues in human life. Does God exist? What can we know about the world? What does it mean to have a mind? How should I treat non-human animals? Do I have free will? This course is an introduction to some of these questions and to the methods philosophers have developed for thinking clearly about them.
    Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
    PHIL 001-601 INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY BARNETT, MARIE TR 0430PM-0600PM Philosophers ask difficult questions about the most basic issues in human life. Does God exist? What can we know about the world? What does it mean to have a mind? How should I treat non-human animals? Do I have free will? This course is an introduction to some of these questions and to the methods philosophers have developed for thinking clearly about them.
      Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
      PHIL 002-001 INTRO TO ETHICS HIRJI, SUKAINA TR 1100AM-1200PM Ethics is the study of right and wrong behavior. This introductory course will introduce students to major ethical theories, the possible sources of normativity, and specific ethical problems and questions. Topics may include euthanasia, abortion, animal rights, the family, sexuality, bioethics, crime and punishment and war.
        Society sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; SOCIETY SECTOR
        PHIL 002-601 INTRO TO ETHICS CHANG, SHEREEN MW 0430PM-0600PM Ethics is the study of right and wrong behavior. This introductory course will introduce students to major ethical theories, the possible sources of normativity, and specific ethical problems and questions. Topics may include euthanasia, abortion, animal rights, the family, sexuality, bioethics, crime and punishment and war.
          Society sector (all classes) SOCIETY SECTOR
          PHIL 003-601 HIST ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY MW 0430PM-0600PM "What is philosophy? How does it differ from science, religion, literature, and other modes of human discourse? This course traces the origins of philosophy as a discipline in the Western tradition, looking to thinkers of Ancient Greece and Rome. We will examine how natural philosophers such as Thales, Anaximander, and Heraclitus distinguished their inquiries from the teachings of poets such as Homer and Hesiod; how ancient atomism had its origins in a response to Parmenides' challenge to the assumption that things change in the world; how Socrates reoriented the focus of philosophy away from the natural world and toward the fundamental ethical question, how shall I live? We will also examine how his pupil, Plato, and subsequently Aristotle, developed elaborate philosophical systems that address the nature of reality, knowledge, and human happiness. Finally, we will examine the ways in which later thinkers such as the Epicureans and Stoics transformed and extended the earlier tradition."
            History & Tradition Sector (all classes) HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR
            PHIL 004-401 HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOS DETLEFSEN, KAREN MW 1100AM-1200PM This course is an introduction to a few central themes in philosophy in the 17th and 18th centuries, and to some of the crucial thinkers who addressed those themes. Topics to be covered may include, among others, the nature of the human being (including the human mind), the relationship between God and the created world, the nature of freedom, and the relations among natural sciences, philosophy and theology in this rich period of human history.
              History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR
              PHIL 005-401 FORMAL LOGIC I SINGER, DANIEL MW 1000AM-1100AM This course provides an introduction to some of the fundamental ideas of logic.Topics will include truth functional logic, quantificational logic, and logical decision problems.
                SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; FORMAL REASONING COURSE; FORMAL REASONING
                PHIL 008-001 THE SOCIAL CONTRACT WODAK, DANIEL MW 1000AM-1100AM This is a critical survey of the history of western modern political philosophy, beginning from the Early Modern period and concluding with the 19th or 20th Century. Our study typically begins with Hobbes and ends with Mill or Rawls. The organizing theme of our investigation will be the idea of the Social Contract. We will examine different contract theories as well as criticisms and proposed alternatives to the contract idea, such as utilitarianism. Besides the above, examples of authors we will read are Locke, Rousseau, Hume, Mill and Marx.
                  Society sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; SOCIETY SECTOR
                  PHIL 010-601 TOPICS IN PHILOSOPHY I: WHAT IS LIFE? DODSON, PETER
                  CHIK, JANICE
                  M 0530PM-0830PM The emergence of animal life marks a pivotal moment in our planet's natural history. Animal consciousness also raises complex and perplexing questions for scientists and philosophers alike. This course sets out to address some of these questions in a systematic fashion, placing the interdependent disciplines of science and philosophy into close dialogue with one another. The central theme of the course will address the question, 'What is life?': in particular, how to understand its particular expression in 'animacy', or what it is to be an animal, and the emergence and concept of humanity within the context of that natural history. In the background of diverse world cultures and faith traditions, seminar participants will also consider the possible role of creative deity within the evolution of creaturely life. The scientific component of this course will therefore focus on theories of evolution, life, language, and death. The philosophical component of the course will begin with ancient approaches to questions about nature and the structure of reality, change and motion, causation, and the idea of 'essential kinds', while also considering modern and contemporary sources for understanding the relationship between life sciences and philosophical thought. No prior knowledge is required. Students will evaluate the topics and arguments of this course through close examination of primary texts, material artifacts, audio-visual sources, and contemporary philosophical and scientific scholarship.
                    PHIL 029-601 PHILOSOPHY OF SPORT MEYER, MILTON W 0600PM-0900PM This is an introductory philosophy course that uses philosophical tools to understand and answer questions that arise in and about sports. Is there a principled basis for determining which methods of performance enhancement are acceptable? Developing a framework to answer this question will take us through: 1) questions about rules: what is their point in sports and what are appropriate reasons to change them; 2) questions about the point of participation in a sport; 3) questions about the kinds of virtues sports participants can demonstrate; and 4) questions about integrity of participants and a sport itself. A related set of questions concerns the appropriate competitors in sporting events: Should competition be restricted to single sex categories; Should competition be divided into disabled and non-disabled categories?
                      PHIL 030-301 Ethics and Contemporary Policy Debates CETTY, CHETAN TR 0130PM-0300PM A central value of liberal democracy is the free and robust exchange of ideas. However, the polarized nature of contemporary public discourse threatens to undermine our democracy. On a variety of pressing moral issues, we disagree more and do so more strongly. How can we better engage with each other on the problems that affect us as democratic citizens? In this CWiC seminar, we will examine the most pertinent policy problems we face today that generate deep ethical disagreement. Topics include: immigration policy, climate change, eating meat, taxation, reparations, racial and gender injustice, access to healthcare, gun control, social media's effect on democracy and artificial intelligence. Students will read philosophical writings on these topics. They will then engage in a group-based class debate with their peers on a chosen topic. The debate will likely be supplemented by other oral assignments, such as an individual presentation, audience participation during the debate, and general class participation. By having students debate with their peers and uncover the underlying ethical complexities of these problems, this CWiC critical speaking seminar aims to highlight the importance of practicing toleration and civility if we are to overcome deep ethical disagreement.
                        PHIL 040-001 MACHINE FAIRNESS HUMPHREYS, JUSTIN MW 0200PM-0330PM Artificial intelligence is causing unprecedented changes and disruptions in many sectors of society, raising fundamental ethical and philosophical questions. Although many researchers are currently studying how tasks can be automated efficiently, only a few have discussed how tasks can be automated fairly, to produce the best possible outcome for society. Machine Fairness is an emerging area of research at the intersection of philosophy, machine learning, computer science, statistics, and psychology. This course is designed as a non-technical introduction to the basic problems involved in answering questions about machine fairness. It focuses on a number of applications, including criminal sentencing, predictive policing, self-driving vehicles, autonomous weapons, and healthcare. Although these areas are quite different, they involve similar questions. What biases might enter into algorithms, and what is their origin? How should we evaluate whether the outcomes of an algorithmic process are just? When things go wrong, who should be held accountable? The course addresses these questions by using methods from philosophical ethics.
                          PHIL 072-001 BIOMEDICAL ETHICS TR 0300PM-0430PM This course is an introduction to bioethics, focusing on ethical questions arising at the beginning and end of life. Topics will include procreative responsibilities, the question of wrongful life, and prenatal moral status as well as questions of justice related to markets for sperm, eggs and gestation. We will also attend to dilemmas at the end of life, including the authority of advance directives, euthanasia and the allocation of life-saving therapies.
                            Society sector (all classes) SOCIETY SECTOR
                            PHIL 077-001 PHILOSOPHY OF LAW PEREIRA DI SALVO, CARLOS TR 1000AM-1100AM This course is an introduction to some of the central philosophical problems of law: What is law? What makes law? What is the relationship between law and morality? Can laws be unjust? Is there a moral obligation to obey the law? We will look at different theories of law, such as positivism and natural law theory, and discuss topics like civil disobedience, liberty and the law, and punishment and the law. The third and final section of the course will consider an unusual and particularly significant kind of law: constitutional law. We will consider the purpose(s) of constitutions, how constitutionalism relates to democracy, and how constitutions ought to be understood and interpreted, in light of our answers to these first two questions. Throughout the course, we will engage with both classic and contemporary work, reading work by Michelle Alexander, Jeremy Bentham, Angela Davis, Ronald Dworkin, John Hart Ely, H.L.A. Hart, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, John Stuart Mill, Robert Nozick, Martha Nussbaum, Richard Posner, Jeremy Waldron, and others.
                              Society sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; SOCIETY SECTOR
                              PHIL 079-301 ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS PATEL, RAJ TR 0900AM-1030AM In this course we will investigate some of the ethical issues that arise from our relationship with the environment. Topics may include : What are our responsibilities toward the environment, as individuals and as members of institutions? How do our responsibilities toward the environment relate to other ethical considerations? Do non-human animals/species/ecosystems have intrinsic value? What should conservationists conserve?
                                PHIL 080-301 AESTHETICS: LOVE, BEAUTY & MEANING LORD, ERROL MW 0200PM-0330PM This course examines philosophical issues centering on the nature and value of the arts. Some questions we'll consider are: What is art? What does it mean to have an aesthetic experience? How are aesthetic experiences different from non-aesthetic ones? What is the relation between art and truth? How do the moral qualities in a work of art affect its aesthetic qualities? Why are emotions important in our interpretations of artworks? What is the relation between art and expression? Do forgeries necessarily have less aesthetic value than original artworks? What are aesthetic judgments, and are they merely expressions of taste? Lecture and discussion will center on both classical and contemporary works in aesthetics.
                                  Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR
                                  PHIL 148-101 PUBLIC PHIL: FIELD WORK VAZQUEZ, MICHAEL TBA TBA- In recent years professional philosophy has witnessed numerous efforts to breakdown the barriers that stand between the academy and its neighboring communities. Such work has invited a lively debate across the discipline about the role philosophy can and should play outside the classroom. This course gives students the opportunity to make a substantive contribution to this timely issue both by reflecting upon and by engaging in 'public philosophy.' Undergraduates will have the opportunity to read, discuss, and distill philosophical texts on a range of topics in moral and political philosophy, especially topics that pertain to civic life in democratic society. Topics include duties and obligations (e.g., the duty to vote), oppression and injustice, cosmopolitanism, patriotism, civil disobedience, propaganda, and political liberalism. Students will also engage with public-facing work done by philosophers on these topics, with the aim of preparing students from a West Philadelphia high school (details TBA) to produce a written piece of public philosophy of their own at the end of the semester. Guest speakers will on occasion visit the seminar to discuss public philosophy or pre-college pedagogy. This course is an Academically Based Community Service course. Registration requires a permit from the instructor.
                                    SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; AN ACADEMICALLY BASED COMMUNITY SERV COURSE; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                    PHIL 148-301 PUBLIC PHILOSOPHY VAZQUEZ, MICHAEL TR 0300PM-0430PM In recent years professional philosophy has witnessed numerous efforts to breakdown the barriers that stand between the academy and its neighboring communities. Such work has invited a lively debate across the discipline about the role philosophy can and should play outside the classroom. This course gives students the opportunity to make a substantive contribution to this timely issue both by reflecting upon and by engaging in 'public philosophy.' Undergraduates will have the opportunity to read, discuss, and distill philosophical texts on a range of topics in moral and political philosophy, especially topics that pertain to civic life in democratic society. Topics include duties and obligations (e.g., the duty to vote), oppression and injustice, cosmopolitanism, patriotism, civil disobedience, propaganda, and political liberalism. Students will also engage with public-facing work done by philosophers on these topics, with the aim of preparing students from a West Philadelphia high school (details TBA) to produce a written piece of public philosophy of their own at the end of the semester. Guest speakers will on occasion visit the seminar to discuss public philosophy or pre-college pedagogy. This course is an Academically Based Community Service course. Registration requires a permit from the instructor.
                                      SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; AN ACADEMICALLY BASED COMMUNITY SERV COURSE; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                      PHIL 155-001 CONTINENTAL PHILOSOPHY HAHMANN, ANDREE TR 0430PM-0600PM In this course we read various texts in the Enlightment tradition and more recent ones critical of modern distortions of this tradition. Readings may include: Kant and Marx, two exemplars of this tradition, as well as the views of the Frankfurt School (e.g Horkheimer and Adorno), Foucault, Derrida, Nietzsche and Saussure.
                                        PHIL 205-001 WHAT IS MEANING? MIRACCHI, LISA TR 0900AM-1000AM This course will survey several central topics in philosophy of mind and language, as well as investigate how these areas of philosophy interact with the scientific study of the mind. Questions addressed may include: What is it to have a mind? What is consciousness? What is it to think, to perceive, to act, to communicate, to feel emotions? What is the relationship between the mind and the brain? Can there be a science of the mind? Of language? What can it tell us? What can philosophy contribute to cognitive science? We will look for more precise ways of asking these questions, and we will study some canonical answers to them.
                                          SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                          PHIL 211-401 ANCIENT MORAL PHILOSOPHY: GREEK AND ROMAN ETHICS MEYER, SUSAN TR 1030AM-1200PM A survey of ethical philosophy in the Ancient Greek tradition. We will study the work of Plato, Aristotle, Epicurus, and the Stoics, including writings of later Roman authors such as Cicero, Seneca, Epictetus, and Marcus Aurelius. The class will be run as a seminar. All works will be read in English translation.
                                            Society sector (all classes) SOCIETY SECTOR
                                            PHIL 223-401 PHIL & VISUAL PERCEPTION BAKER, TODD TR 1030AM-1200PM In this course, we'll use the biology, psychology and phenomenology of vision to explore philosophical questions abaout color, such as these: Color vision helps us get around in our environments, but in what sense is it a window onto reality, if it is? Are colors properties of objects, or are they inherently private, subjective properties of minds? What can non-human forms of color vision teach us about the nature of color, and how should we empirically study color vision? Do we need to see in color to understand it? How do our ordinary ways of talking and thinking about colors relate to the experiences we have in color? How does color vision figure in aesthetic judgment? And to what degree can it be influenced by learning, or by social biases like sexist or racist prejudices?
                                              PHIL 231-001 EPISTEMOLOGY LEWIS, MAX TR 0130PM-0300PM Two basic assumptions of academic research are that there are truths and we can know them. Epistemology is the study how knowledge, what it is, how it is produced, and how we can have it. Metaphysics, the study of the basic constituents of reality, the study of being as such. In this introduction to metaphysics and epistemology, we will ask hard questions about the nature of reality and knowledge. No philosophy background is required for this course.
                                                PHIL 247-401 MARX BIAREISHYK, SIARHEI TR 0430PM-0600PM Precious few, if any, communist states exist today as Karl Marx would have imagined them. Indeed, almost every part of the 19th-century culture Marx put under his philosophical microscope has in one way or another vanished or been radically transformed: the state, the school, even sex have been fundamentally altered during a long 20th century filled with revolutions of culture. This class asks: is there a future for a philosopher whose political projects seem so precarious--if they have not failed outright-in the face of global capitalism? We will try to answer this question by examining the origins and the implications of Marx's writings, but also his complex legacy, from Lenin through Guevara to Foucault and Zizek. The course will conclude with a consideration of the role of the radical in today's global politics and cultural sphere.
                                                  Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
                                                  PHIL 271-001 GLOBAL JUSTICE TAN, KOK-CHOR MW 1100AM-1200PM This course is an introduction to some of the central problems in global justice. Samples of these topics include: What are our duties to respond to world poverty and what is the basis of this duty? Is global inequality in itself a matter of justice? How universal are human rights? Should human rights defer to cultural claims at all? Is there a right to intervene in another country to protect human rights there? Indeed can intervention to protect human rights ever be a duty? Who is responsible for the environment? We will read some influential contemporary essays by philosophers on these topics with the goal of using the ideas in these papers as a springboard for our own further discussion and analysis.
                                                    SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                                    PHIL 281-301 LOVE AND SEX HIRJI, SUKAINA TR 0430PM-0600PM This is a course on philosophical topics surrounding love and sex. We will touch on issues in all areas of philosophy including ethics, political philosophy, metaphysics, philosophy of language, and epistemology. You will develop the sorts of skills fundamental to philosophy: understanding and reconstructing arguments, evaluating arguments, and developing your own argumentative abilities. You will also acquire theoretical tools that might be useful for thinking about your own love and sex lives, and the lives of those around you.
                                                      PHIL 291-301 PHILOSOPHY OF RACE SPENCER, QUAYSHAWN TR 1030AM-1200PM Historically, philosophical questions about race have been about the nature and reality of race, the nature of racism, and social or political questions related to race or racism. In fitting with that history, the first part of the course will focus on the nature and reality of race, as understood in biology and as understood by ordinary people. We will begin by looking at biological race theories from Francois Bernier in 1684 to Pigliucci and Kaplan in 2003. Next, we will look at the philosophical work that has been done on the nature and reality of race as ordinarily understood in the contemporary United States. We will discuss racial anti-realism, social constructionism about race, and biological racial realism from well-known philosophers of race like Anthony Appiah, Sally Haslanger, and Joshua Glasgow. The second part of the course will focus on the nature of racism and social or political questions related to race or racism. In our discussion of racism, we will cover, at least, intrinsic racism, extrinsic racism, and institutional racism. In our discussion of social or political issues related to race or racism, we will look at whether any US racial groups should be used to diagnose, study, or treat genetic disorders.
                                                        PHIL 372-301 TOPICS IN ETHICS LORD, ERROL MW 0330PM-0500PM This majors seminar will cover selected topics in ethics. The content will vary from semester to semester.
                                                          MAJORS ONLY
                                                          PHIL 376-301 JUSTICE TAN, KOK-CHOR MW 0200PM-0330PM This majors seminar will focus on contemporary works on liberalism, democracy, capitalism, and distributive justice. Questions to be discussed may include: Which rights and liberties are fundamental in a constitutional democracy? What is equality and what requirements does it impose? Are economic rights of property and freedom of contract equally important as personal liberties of speech, religion, and association? Does capitalism realize a just distribution of income and wealth? What is socialism and is it potentially just, or necessarily unjust? Readings from works by John Rawls, Robert Nozick, Milton Friedman, and others.
                                                            MAJORS ONLY
                                                            PHIL 380-301 THE PHILOSOPHY OF MARX PEREIRA DI SALVO, CARLOS TR 0300PM-0430PM A majors seminar in Philosophy. Karl Marx is one of the most politically and intellectually influential philosophers of the modern period. Even today, in the aftermath of Soviet Communism, but also in the aftermath of the Great Recession, his ideas continue to be debated in academic circles, in the financial press, and among pundits, activists, and politicians. This seminar will survey his canonical writings roughly in chronological order. We will focus thematically on: Marx's views on morality and ideology; his theories of history, the modern capitalist economy, and the modern state; his views on political change and political agency; and on the few but suggestive passages in which he imagined what a post-capitalist society might look like. Readings will span from the Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of his youth to the Ethnological Notebooks written during the last decade of his life.
                                                              MAJORS ONLY
                                                              PHIL 405-301 PHIL OF LANGUAGE MIRACCHI, LISA M 0330PM-0630PM This course provides an overview of 20th century analytic philosophy of language. Questions we will ask may include: How do words refer? How do they combine to express thoughts? How do words relate to ocncepts or to thoughts more generally? What do words and sentences mean? How do we use them to communicate with each other? How does word and sentence meaning depend on the contexts in which they are spoken or heard, or on stable features of environments of linguistic speakers?
                                                                PHIL 413-401 LOGIC II WEINSTEIN, SCOTT TR 0900AM-1030AM The second semester of a two-semester course on the fundamental results and techniques of mathematical logic. Topics will be drawn from model theory, proof theory, recursion theory, and set theory. Connections between logic and algebra, analysis, combinatorics, computer science, and the foundations of mathematics will be emphasized.
                                                                  PHIL 414-301 PHIL OF MATH WEINSTEIN, SCOTT TR 1200PM-0130PM The course will focus on the development of the foundations and philosophy of mathematics from the late nineteenth-century through the present day. Topics may include logicism, formalism, intuitionism, and the foundations of set theory. Ample consideration will be given to some of the fundamental results of mathematical logic, such as the Godel incompleteness theorems and the independence of the Continuum Hypothesis from Zermelo-Fraenkel set theory, that have had a profound impact on contemporary approaches to the philosophy of mathematics.
                                                                    PHIL 428-401 SOCIAL NORMS BICCHIERI, CRISTINA T 0500PM-0800PM Social norms are the rules we live by, and we encounter them in any area of ourlife. Social norms often guarantee the smooth functioning of a group or organization. Sometimes, however, these norms are inefficient or do not benefit society at large. What can we do to change these harmful collective behaviors? Social psychology, philosophy, sociology, rational-choice, legal theory, and even economics, are investigating and theorizing pro-social behavior, justice motivation, and moral and social norms. In this course, we will examine the latest and best in this emerging multidisciplinary field. Students will be encouraged to apply its findings and methods to their area of interest.
                                                                      PHIL 474-301 NORMATIVE ETHICS WODAK, DANIEL MW 0200PM-0330PM Some particular acts are morally right; other acts are morally wrong. The task of normative ethics is to provide a general account of which acts are morally right or wrong and why they are morally right or wrong. The primary goal of this course is to provide an advanced survey of two theories that dominate contemporary ethics: consequentialism and deontology. Consequentialists - such as, most famously, the British utilitarians: Bentham, Mill and Sidgwick - hold that acts are right or wrong because of their good or bad consequences. Consequentialism faces numerous objections: that it is wrong to make trade-offs between benefits and harms to different individuals; that it requires us to violate rights; that it is too demanding; and that it does not respect our special obligations to our friends and family. These objections are used to motivate deontology. We will explore Immanuel Kant's influential version deontology, and the challenges that it faces in relation to the prohibition on lying, on how we should treat the risk of wrong-doing, and on the moral status of animals. The secondary goal of this course is to develop the philosophical skills that we use to understand, evaluate, and defend moral theories.
                                                                        PHIL 479-301 MODERN POLITICAL PHIL FREEMAN, SAMUEL MW 0330PM-0500PM A survey of several works in modern political philosophy, including Thomas Hobbes's, Leviathan; John Locke's, Second Treatise on Government and Letter Concerning Toleration; David Hume's 'Of the Original Contract' and 'On Justice'; John Stuart Mill's Utilitarianism, On Liberty, and The Subjection of Women; excerpts from Karl Marx's Capital and other writings; and John Rawls's A Theory of Justice.
                                                                          PHIL 505-401 FORMAL LOGIC I SINGER, DANIEL MW 1000AM-1100AM This course provides an introduction to some of the fundamental ideas of logic. Topics will include truth functional logic, quantificational logic, and logical decision problems.
                                                                            FORMAL REASONING COURSE; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; FORMAL REASONING
                                                                            PHIL 525-301 TOPICS PHIL SCI SPENCER, QUAYSHAWN R 0130PM-0430PM For the last four centuries, scientific research has provided our most reliable understanding of the world. Although the scientific revolution started modestly with attempts to understand stellar movement, we now know the age and constitution of the universe, the basis of heredity, and we can make and break chemical bonds at will. By all appearances, science seems to have made substantial progress from the scientific revolution to the global scientific enterprise of the 21st centry. This course is about how science has generated this knowledge, and whether it has been as progressive and reliable as it seems. We will consider methodological issues such as the sources of scientific knowledge, objectivity, the growing importance of computation in the natural sciences, and the nature of modeling. We will examine products of scientific research: explanations, models, theories, and laws of nature. And we will discuss questions about science and values, including whether non-scientific values can and should enter scientific research, the relationship between science and religion, and the role of the public in guiding the scientific enterprise.
                                                                              PHIL 526-301 PHILOSOPHY OF PSYCHOLOGY HATFIELD, GARY R 0430PM-0730PM An investigation of issues that arise from scientific psychology and are investigated philosophically or have implications for philosophy. Specific topics vary by semester. In Spring 2019 the seminar will examine various instances of appealing to appearances in analyzing perception and its relation to an external world. Authors to be studied include Descartes, Hume, Russell, Sellars, and Chisholm.
                                                                                PHIL 532-301 TOPICS IN EPISTEMOLOGY SINGER, DANIEL M 0200PM-0500PM This seminar will cover topics of interest to contemporary epistemologists. Possible topics may include skepticism, accounts of knowledge and justification, virtue epistemology, formal epistemology, social epistemology, feminist epistemology, meta-epistemology and epistemic normativity.
                                                                                  PHIL 551-301 TOPICS EARLY MODERN PHIL DETLEFSEN, KAREN W 0330PM-0630PM 125 A seminar in philosophy of the early modern period (roughly 1600-1800), covering specific figures and/or topics. Examples of figures studied include (but are not limited to) Descartes Cavendish, Astell, Locke, Hume, Du Chatelet,or Kant. Examples of topics studied include (but again are not limited to)substance, causation, freedom, natural philosophy,education, the human being,the private and the public, or political authority.
                                                                                    PHIL 554-640 Contemporary Continental Philosophy STEINBERG, STEPHEN T 0600PM-0840PM This MLA seminar is an introduction to 20th-century continental European philosophy, focusing on the origins and development of phenomenology, existentialism, hermeneutics, and deconstruction. No previous background in philosophy is required. We will begin with an introduction to the phenomenology of Edmund Husserl and the contemporary debate over its proper interpretation. Then we will examine three existentialist critics of Husserl, whose philosophies have influenced much of recent continental thought: Martin Heidegger, Jean-Paul Sartre, and Maurice Merleau-Ponty. Finally, we will examine the important influence of phenomenology and existentialism on contemporary trends in continental philosophy as exhibited in works by Paul Ricoeur, Hans Georg Gadamer, Jacques Derrida, Hannah Arendt, and Emmanuel Levinas. Finally, we will examine the important influence of phenomenology and existentialism on contemporary trends in continental philosophy as exhibited in works by Paul Ricoeur, Hans Georg Gadamer, Jacques Derrida, Hannah Arendt, and Emmanuel Levinas.
                                                                                      PHIL 562-640 MLA Proseminar: World Philosophies DETLEFSEN, KAREN M 0530PM-0810PM Most philosophy as it is taught in universities in the USA focuses on western philosophy. But people across the globe practice philosophy, often in a wide variety of genres and using a range of methods, and sometimes to grapple with problems and questions that grow out of local lived experience. This course focuses on a range of philosophies from around the world, including texts from Latin America, Indigenous North and South America, Africa and Asia. In addition to gaining a broader understanding of how philosophy has been practiced, and continues to be practiced, around the world, we will spend time interrogating the nature of philosophy itself, and what we can learn about our discipline by expanding our view of its practitioners and the modes in which it is practiced.
                                                                                        PHIL 578-301 TOPICS IN POLITICAL PHIL FREEMAN, SAMUEL T 0300PM-0600PM This is a topics-based graduate seminar in political philosophy. Examples of topics we can examine in this course include distributive justice, liberty, equality, and global justice. Course readings will be drawn from a combination of seminal and more recent works on the selected topics.
                                                                                          PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION