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Courses for Fall 2017

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
PHIL 001-001 INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY SINGER, DANIEL STITELER HALL B26 MW 1000AM-1100AM Problems of Philosophy: The aim of this course is to introduce some of the major topics and methods of analytic philosophy. As the course goes on, the questions we consider will become more explanatorily deep. It begins with questions about what we should do (Normative Ethics). We then move to questions about how we can even do anything at all (Free Will). We then consider how we might know about any of this (Epistemology). Finally we ask what we even are and what it means for us to be at all (Mind and Personal Identity). This course will not assume any background in philosophy. For most students, it will be a challenging, though hopefully worthwhile, course. The course will push you to understand and communicate clearly about material that is often difficult to understand. Along with introducing you to analytic philosophy, this course will help students become better skilled in understanding and intelligently questioning sophisticated arguments, which can come in handy in a large number of pursuits. Problems of Philosophy: The aim of this course is to introduce some of the major topics and methods of analytic philosophy. As the course goes on, the questions we consider will become more explanatorily deep. It begins with questions about what we should do (Normative Ethics). We then move to questions about how we can even do anything at all (Free Will). We then consider how we might know about any of this (Epistemology). Finally we ask what we even are and what it means for us to be at all (Mind and Personal Identity). This course will not assume any background in philosophy. For most students, it will be a challenging, though hopefully worthwhile, course. The course will push you to understand and communicate clearly about material that is often difficult to understand. Along with introducing you to analytic philosophy, this course will help students become better skilled in understanding and intelligently questioning sophisticated arguments, which can come in handy in a large number of pursuits.
    Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
    PHIL 001-601 INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY NOAH, THOMAS WILLIAMS HALL 25 TR 0430PM-0600PM Problems of Philosophy: The aim of this course is to introduce some of the major topics and methods of analytic philosophy. As the course goes on, the questions we consider will become more explanatorily deep. It begins with questions about what we should do (Normative Ethics). We then move to questions about how we can even do anything at all (Free Will). We then consider how we might know about any of this (Epistemology). Finally we ask what we even are and what it means for us to be at all (Mind and Personal Identity). This course will not assume any background in philosophy. For most students, it will be a challenging, though hopefully worthwhile, course. The course will push you to understand and communicate clearly about material that is often difficult to understand. Along with introducing you to analytic philosophy, this course will help students become better skilled in understanding and intelligently questioning sophisticated arguments, which can come in handy in a large number of pursuits.
      Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
      PHIL 002-301 ETHICS MEYER, MILTON VAN PELT LIBRARY 302 TR 1030AM-1200PM Ethics is the study of right and wrong behavior. This introductory course will introduce students to major ethical theories, the possible sources of normativity, and specific ethical problems and questions. Topics may include euthanasia, abortion, animal rights, the family, sexuality, bioethics, crime and punishment and war. Three sorts of questions belong to the philosophical study of ethics: (a) Practical ethics discusses specific moral problems, often those we find most contested (e.g. abortion, euthanasia, killing noncombatants in war). (b) Ethical theory tried to develop systematic answers to moral problems, often by looking for general principles that explain moral judgments and rules (e.g. consequentialism, contractarianism). (c) Meta-ethics investigates questions about the nature of moral theories and their subject matter (e.g. are they subjective or objective, relative or non-relative?) We will rigorously investigate all three of these types of questions. A large part of the course will be focused on two highly contentious moral problems, abortion and killing noncombatants in war. The central aim of the required readings and discussion is, a) to develop each question deeply and sharply enough for us to understand why it has been contentious; b) to see what new evidence could change the nature of the problem; and c) to suggest how to seek that further evidence. We will focus on how to read complex contemporary philosophical prose in order to outline and evaluate the arguments embedded within it. This will provide the basis for writing papers in which you defend a position with evidence and arguments. These skills are central to the practice of Philosophy. This course does not presuppose that students already have these skills. It is intended to teach them and presupposes a willingness on the part of students to do what is necessary to learn them. What this involves is detailed in a note on Courses in Touch called "Success in the Course". You should read this note before enrolling in the course to understand the commitment this course involves. Graded work: weekly paragraphs on a topic of your choice; three papers in multiple drafts; take-home final exam; class participation.
        Society sector (all classes) SOCIETY SECTOR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
        PHIL 003-401 HIST ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY MEYER, SUSAN STEPHEN A. LEVIN BUILDING 111 TR 0900AM-1030AM This course is an introduction to philosopy in the ancient world. While today, philosophy is considered a branch of academic inquiry, many of the ancient Greeks and Romans, however, held a radically different conception of the discipline. For them, philosophy was nothing less than an entire way of life--not just a set of doctrines or arguments, but an orientation and set of lived practices, a conscious and continual reforming of the self in light of some principle or principles. In this course, we will examine the major movements and figures of ancient philosophy. Major figures will include Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics, the Epicureans, and the Skeptics.
          History & Tradition Sector (all classes) HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; SENIOR ASSOCIATES
          PHIL 004-601 HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOS PARKER, HAROLD FISHER-BENNETT HALL 323 TR 0630PM-0830PM This course is an introduction to a few central themes in philosophy in the 17th and 18th centuries, and to some of the crucial thinkers who addressed those themes. Topics to be covered may include, among others, the nature of the human being (including the human mind), the relationship between God and the created world, the nature of freedom, and the relations among natural sciences, philosophy and theology in this rich period of human history.
            History & Tradition Sector (all classes) HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR
            PHIL 008-401 THE SOCIAL CONTRACT TAN, KOK-CHOR COLLEGE HALL 200 MW 0900AM-1000AM This is a critical survey of the history of western modern political philosophy, beginning from the Early Modern period and concluding with the 19th or 20th Century. Our study typically begins with Hobbes and ends with Mill or Rawls. The organizing theme of our inventigation will be the idea of the Social Contract. We will examine different contract theories as well as criticisms and proposed alternatives to the contract idea, such as utilitarianism. Besides the above, examples of authors we will read are Locke, Rousseau, Hume, Mill and Marx.
              Society sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; SOCIETY SECTOR
              PHIL 010-401 PLATO'S REPUBLIC STRUCK, PETER CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 204 TR 1030AM-1200PM In classical Athens the question of how a government should work was an urgent one. They invented democracy, adopted it successfully for decades, and then it faced challenges, from oligarchs and others. At this time of tumult, the philosopher Plato set out to explore the question of the best form of government by framing it as a question of justice. Which mode of governing is the one that delivers justice? But to understand this question, a person first needs to understand what justice itself is. Coming up with an answer to this is a thorny and difficult prospect. By focusing on Plato's Republic, this course aims to explore how best to govern a society, what kinds of qualities one should expect in a leader, and how these questions are connected to very basic understandings about human nature, society, and the world in general.
                FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
                PHIL 025-601 PHILOS OF SCIENCE: PHILOS OF SCIENCE CHANG, SHEREEN MCNEIL BUILDING 167-8 W 0600PM-0900PM What counts as a scientific theory? What counts as evidence for a scientific theory? Are scientific inferences justified? Does science give us truths or approximate truths about a world that exists independently of us? How can we know? Does it matter? These are all perennial questions in the philosophy of science, and the goal of this course is to look at how philosophers have answered these questions since the scientific revolution. In addition to reading classic work by philosophers of science, we will read material from living and dead scientists in order to gain a deeper appreciation of the philosophical questions that have troubled the most brilliant scientists in Western science.
                  Nat Sci & Math Sector (new curriculum only) NATURAL SCIENCE & MATH SECTOR
                  PHIL 026-401 PHILOSOPHY OF SPACE AND TIME DOMOTOR, ZOLTAN STITELER HALL B26 MWF 1100AM-1200PM This course provides an introduction to the philosophy and intellectual history of space-time and cosmological models from ancient to modern times with special emphasis on paradigm shifts, leading to Einstein's theories of special and general relativity and cosmology. Other topics include Big Bang, black holes stellar structure, the metaphysics of substance, particles, fields, and superstrings, unification and grand unification of modern physical theories. No philosophy of physics background is presupposed.
                    Nat Sci & Math Sector (new curriculum only) NATURAL SCIENCE & MATH SECTOR
                    PHIL 028-401 FEMINIST PHILOSOPHY JACQUART, MELISSA JAFFE BUILDING 104 TR 1200PM-0130PM This course is an introduction to feminist thought, both in theory and in practice. We will consider how feminist thought emerged and evolved, as well as how feminist theories respond to various intellectual, social and political challenges. Questions we will address include: What exactly is feminism? How does one's gender identity impact one's lived experiences? How should we revise, reformulate, or rethink traditional answers to politial and ethical issues in light of feminist theories? How can feminist analyses contribute to the development of better science, and our conceptions of knowledge? This course is an introduction to feminist thought, both in theory and in practice. We will consider how feminist thought emerged and evolved, as well as how feminist theories respond to various intellectual, social and political challenges. Questions we will address include: What exactly is feminism? How does one's gender identity impact one's lived experiences? How should we revise, reformulate, or rethink traditional answers to political and ethical issues in light of feminist theories? How can feminist analyses contribute to the development of better science, and our conceptions of knowledge?
                      PHIL 032-301 Enhancing the Human Mind through Technology PURPURA, GARY WILLIAMS HALL 741 MW 0330PM-0500PM Transhumanists seek to extend the capacities of the human mind beyond the bounds of the human brain and body through technology. Indeed, for them, such an extension of human thinking and feeling represents the next big step in human cognitive evolution. In this course, we will examine the philosophical conception of a mind that underpins this movement to extend the human mind beyond human biology. Through an examination of the hypothesis that there can be non-biological thinking and feeling, we consider whether technologies that enable or enhance human mental faculties might one day completely supplant the biological machinery of the human body. We will also consider the moral issues surrounding the creation of transhumans. The questions that we consider in this course will get to the heart of what it means to possess a human mind and indeed to be a human being.
                        FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
                        PHIL 044-401 INTRO COGNITIVE SCIENCE YANG, CHARLES
                        MIRACCHI, LISA
                        TOWNE BUILDING 100 TR 0130PM-0300PM Scope and limits of computer representation of knowledge, belief and perception, and the nature of cognitive processes from a computational prespective.
                          SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; FORMAL REASONING COURSE; FORMAL REASONING
                          PHIL 050-401 INTRODUCTION TO INDIAN PHILOSOPHY PATEL, DEVEN MCNEIL BUILDING 309 MW 1100AM-1200PM This course will take the student thorugh the major topics of Indian philosophyby first introducing the fundamental concepts and terms that are necessary fo r a deeper understanding of themes that pervade the philosophical literature of India--arguments for and against the existence of God, for example the ontological status of external objects, the means of valid knowledge, standards of proof, the discourse on the aims of life. The readings will emphasize classical Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain philosophical articulations (from 700 B.E. E. to 16th century CE) but we will also supplement our study of these materials with contemporary or relatively recent philosophical writings to modern India. This course will take the student through the major topics of Indian philosophy by first introducing the fundamental concepts and terms that are necessary for a deeper understanding of themes that pervade the philosophical literature of India -- arguments for and against the existence of God, for example, the ontological status of external objects, the means of valid knowledge, standards of proof, the discourse on the aims of life. The readings will emphasize classical Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain philosophical articulations (from 700 B.C.Eto 16th century CE) but we will also supplement our study of these materials with contemporary or relatively recent philosophical writings in modern India.
                            History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; CROSS CULTURAL ANALYSIS; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR; CROSS-CULTURAL ANALYSIS
                            PHIL 071-001 ETHICS OF EATING CHIGNELL, ANDREW CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 402 MW 1200PM-0100PM We all face difficult moral decisions on occasion. This course introduces students to the idea that we face such a decision several times a day in deciding what to eat. How should facts about animal life and death inform this decision? Is the suffering involved in meat, egg, and dairy production really bad en0ough to make the practices immoral? How do our dietary choices affect local and non-local economies, the environment, and other people generally? Finally, given the deep connections between eating practices and various ethnic, religious and class identities, how can we implement a reasonable food policy for an expanding world population while also respecting these important differences? The goal of this course is not to teach some preferred set of answers to these questions. The goal is rather to give participants the basic tools required to reflect clearly and effectively on the questions themselves. These tools include a working knowledge of major moral theories developed by philosophers, and an understanding of basic empirical issues related to food. In addition to readings, lectures, and required sections, the course may involve trips to some local food-production facilities, as well as supplemental lectures by experts from Penn, Philadelphia, and beyond. We all face difficult moral decisions on occasion. This course introduces students to the idea that we face such a decision several times a day in deciding what to eat. How should facts about animal life and death inform this decision? Is the suffering involved in meat, egg, and dairy production really bad enough to make the practices immoral? How do our dietary choices affect local and non-local economies, the environment, and other people generally? Finally, given the deep connections between eating practices and various ethnic, religious and class identities, how can we implement a reasonable food policy for an expanding world population while also respecting these important differences? The goal of this course is not to teach some preferred set of answers to these questions. The goal is rather to give participants the basic tools required to reflect clearly and effectively on the questions themselves. These tools include a working knowledge of major moral theories developed by philosophers, and an understanding of basic empirical issues related to food. In addition to readings, lectures, and required sections, the course may involve trips to some local food-production facilities, as well as supplemental lectures by experts from Penn, Philadelphia, and beyond.
                              SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                              PHIL 072-401 BIOMEDICAL ETHICS PEREIRA DI SALVO, CARLOS ANNENBERG SCHOOL 111 MW 0100PM-0200PM This course is an introduction to bioethics, focusing on ethical questions arising at the beginning and end of life. Topics will include procreative responsibilities, the question of wrongful life, and prenatal moral status as well as questions of justice related to markets for sperm, eggs and gestation. We will also attend to dilemmas at the end of life, including the authority of advance directives, euthanasia and the allocation of life-saving therapies.
                                Society sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; SOCIETY SECTOR
                                PHIL 074-301 BUSINESS ETHICS HALL, GREGORY FISHER-BENNETT HALL 141 TR 0300PM-0430PM In this course we will begin by examining practical ethical dilemmas facing businesses. Since usually people, not businesses, face ethical quandaries, we will consider how a business can face an ethical dilemma at all. Maybe it doesn't even make sense to attribute responsibilities, liabilities, or agency to corporations. If businesses do indeed have moral responsibilities, perhaps that means that employees have corresponding rights against their employers. With a better understanding of how the ethical world intersects with the business world, we can thoughtfully discuss the place of the corporation in society.
                                  PHIL 203-301 THINKING WITH MODELS CANCELED When a flu pandemic strikes, who should get accinated first? What's our best strategy for minimizing the damage of global climate change? Why is Philadelphia racially segregated? Why do most sexually reproducing species have two sexes, in roughly even proportions? These and many other scientific and practical problems required us to get a handle on complex systems. And an important part of deepening our understanding and sharpening our intuitions requires us to think with models. Students in this laboratory-based course will learn about the varied practices of modeling, and will learn how to construct, analyze, and validate models.
                                    General Requirement in Formal Reasoning & Analysis FORMAL REASONING COURSE; FORMAL REASONING
                                    PHIL 205-001 WHAT IS MEANING? MIRACCHI, LISA CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 402 TR 1200PM-0100PM This course will survey several central topics in philosophy of mind and language, as well as investigate how these areas of philosophy interact with the scientific study of the mind. Among the questions we'll be asking are: What is it to have a mind? What is consciousness? What is it to think, to perceive, to act, to communicate, to feel emotions? What is the relationship between the mind and the brain? Can there be a science of the mind? Of language? What can it tell us? What can philosophy contribute to cognitive science? We will look for more precise ways of asking these questions, and we will study some canonical answers to them. We will also look for places where more precise ways of asking these questions build in hidden assumptions, and what that might mean for both a philosophy and a science of the mind. This course will survey several central topics in philosophy of mind and language, as well as investigate how these areas of philosophy interact with the scientific study of the mind. Among the questions we'll be asking are: What is it to have a mind? What is consciousness? What is it to think, to perceive, to act, to communicate, to feel emotions? What is the relationship between the mind and the brain? Can there be a science of the mind? Of language? What can it tell us? What can philosophy contribute to cognitive science? We will look for more precise ways of asking these questions, and we will study some canonical answers to them. We will also look for places where more precise ways of asking these questions build in hidden assumptions, and what that might mean for both a philosophy and a science of the mind.
                                      SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                      PHIL 221-301 PHILOSOPHY EAST AND WEST TAN, KOK-CHOR VAN PELT LIBRARY 402 MW 0200PM-0330PM Our goal in this course is to bring Western Philosophy and Eastern Philosophy into dialogue. Topics we will cover include skepticism and knowledge, ethics and the good life, moral responsibility and personal relationships, and political obligations and justice. Do the Western and Eastern philosophical traditions approach these topics in the same way? Do they even share an understanding of what the problems and issues at stake are? And what can we learn from comparative philosophy? This freshman seminar does not presuppose prior knowledge of philosophy. Examples of authors we will study include Descartes, Aristotle, Mencius, and Confucius. Our goal in this course is to bring Western Philosophy and Eastern Philosophy into dialogue. Topics we will cover include skepticism and knowledge, ethics and the good life, moral responsibility and personal relationships, and political obligations and justice. Do the Western and Eastern philosophical traditions approach these topics in the same way? Do they even share an understanding of what the problems and issues at stake are? And what can we learn from comparative philosophy? This freshman seminar does not presuppose prior knowledge of philosophy. Examples of authors we will study include Descartes, Aristotle, Mencius, and Confucius.
                                        FRESHMAN SEMINAR; FRESHMAN SEMINAR
                                        PHIL 233-401 PHILOSOPHY OF ECONOMICS PEREIRA DI SALVO, CARLOS FISHER-BENNETT HALL 138 TR 0300PM-0430PM In this course, general philosophy of science issues are applied to economics, and some problems specific to economics are tackled. While analytical questions like "What is economics?" or "What is an economic explanation" must be pursued, the ultimate goal is practical: What is good economics? How can economists contribute to a better understanding of society, and a better society? How can we make economics better? Topics to be discussed include the following: specific object and method of economics as a social science; its relation with other disciplines (physics, psychology and evolutionary theory); values in economics (welfare, freedom, equality and neutrality); the role of understanding and possible limits of a quantitative approach to human behavior (purposefulness, freedom, creativity, innovation); prediction, unpredictability and the pretension of prediction; causation in econometrics and in economic theory (equilibrium); selfishness and utility maximization (cognitive and behaviorist interpretations); economic models and unrealistic assumptions (realism and instrumentalism); empirical basis of economics (observation and experiment); microeconomics and macroeconomics (reductionism and autonomy); pluralism in economics (mainstream economics and heterodox schools).
                                          PHIL 277-401 JUSTICE, LAW & MORALITY: PHILOSOPHY AND THE CONSTITUTION FREEMAN, SAMUEL STITELER HALL B26 MW 1200PM-0100PM The course will focus on the philosophical background to the individual rights protected by the U.S. Constitution, including 1st Amendment freedoms of religion, expression, and association; the 14th amendment guarantee of Due Process and the rights of privacy, abortion, assisted suicide, and marriage; the Equal Protection clause and equal political rights and the legitimacy of affirmative action; and the Takings and Contract clauses and their bearing on rights of private property and economic freedoms. In addition to Supreme Court decisions on these issues, we will read works by political philosophers and constitutional theorists, including J.S. Mill, Ronald Dworkin, Cass Sunstein, Martha Nussbaum, Katherine MacKinnon and others.
                                            SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; PERMISSION NEEDED FROM INSTRUCTOR
                                            PHIL 291-301 PHILOSOPHY OF RACE SPENCER, QUAYSHAWN PERRY WORLD HOUSE 108 TR 1030AM-1200PM Historically, philosophical questions about race have been about the nature and reality of race, the nature of racism, and social or political questions related to race or racism. In fitting with that history, the first part of the course will focus on the nature and reality of race, as understood in biology and as understood by ordinary people. We will begin by looking at biological race theories from Francois Bernier in 1684 to Pigliucci and Kaplan in 2003. Next, we will look at the philosophical work that has been done on the nature and reality of race as ordinarily understood in the contemporary United States. We will discuss racial anti-realism, social constructionism about race, and biological racial realism from well-known philosophers of race like Anthony Appiah, Sally Haslanger, and Joshua Glasgow. The second part of the course will focus on the nature of racism and social or political questions related to race or racism. In our discussion of racism, we will cover, at least, intrinsic racism, extrinsic racism, and institutional racism. In our discussion of social or political issues related to race or racism, we will look at whether any US racial groups should be used to diagnose, study, or treat genetic disorders. Historically, philosophical questions about race have been about the nature and reality of race, the nature of racism, and social or political questions related to race or racism. In fitting with that history, the first part of the course will focus on the nature and reality of race, as understood in biology and as understood by ordinary people. We will begin by looking at biological race theories from Francois Bernier in 1684 to Pigliucci and Kaplan in 2003. Next, we will look at the philosophical work that has been done on the nature and reality of race as ordinarily understood in the contemporary United States. We will discuss racial anti-realism, social constructionism about race, and biological racial realism from well-known philosophers of race like Anthony Appiah, Sally Haslanger, and Joshua Glasgow. The second part of the course will focus on the nature of racism and social or political questions related to race or racism. In our discussion of racism, we will cover, at least, intrinsic racism, extrinsic racism, and institutional racism. In our discussion of social or political issues related to race or racism, we will look at whether any US racial groups should be used to diagnose, study, or treat genetic disorders.
                                              PHIL 325-301 PHILOSOPHY OF PHYSICS DOMOTOR, ZOLTAN WILLIAMS HALL 320 MW 0200PM-0330PM The aim of this course is to explore the relationships between philosophy and physics, with a focus on prominent foundational issues in modern physics. The course is organized around four main areas. In the first part, we focus on the philosophy and (classical and relativistic) structure of space and time, including the proliferations of physical geometries (Lobachevskian and Riemannian) ofcurved space time. Are space and time real? If so, what kind of entities are they? Metaphysically, we have a choice between presentism and eternalism, and regarding the nature of physical objects in space-tme, there is a choice between endurantism and perdurantism. Is time travel possible? In the second part, we concentrate on the basic metaphysical and epistemological questions posed by physics: causality, determinism, randomnes, and the nature of physical laws. How is cause conveyed from one physical body to another? Are the laws of physics true? In the third part, we turn to the principal philosophical issues raised by quantum physics: structural realism and the interpretations of quantum mechanics, non-locality and Bell's theorem, the infamous Schrodinger cat paradox, hidden variables, and quantum measurement. What is primary -- particles or waves? Finally in the fourth part, we investigate the metaphysics underlying Big Bang and Ekpyrotic cosmological theories, and evidence for a parallel universe and baby universes. All these philosophical issues will be addressed by looking at some simple examples or episodes taken from modern physics. The bulk of the readings will come from two textbooks (available at the Barnes & Nobel University Bookstore) and articles in journals. PREREQUISTITES: The course is entirely self-contained: All topics in physics that are necessary for understanding the pertinent philosophical problems will be reviewed in class. The aim of this course is to explore the relationships between philosophy and physics, with a focus on prominent foundational issues in modern physics. The course is organized around four main areas. In the first part, we focus on the philosophy and (classical and relativistic) structure of space and time, including the proliferation of physical geometries (Lobachevskian and Riemannian) of curved spacttime. Are space and time real? If so, what kind of entities are they? Metaphysically, we have a choice between presentism and eternalism, and regarding the nature of physical objects in space-time, there is a choice between endurantism and perdurantism. Is time travel possible? In the second part, we concentrate on the basic metaphysical and epistemological questions posed by physics: causality, determinism, randomness, and the nature of physical laws. How is cause conveyed from one physical body to another? Are the laws of physics true? In the third part, we turn to the principal philosophical issues raised by quantum physics: structural realism and the interpretations of quantum mechanics, non-locality and Bell's theorem, the infamous Schrodinger cat paradox, hidden variables, and quantum measurement. What is primary -- particles or waves? Finally in the fourth part, we investigate the metaphysics underlying Big Bang and Ekpyrotic cosmological theories, and evidence for a parallel universe and baby universes. All these philosophical issues will by addressed by looking at some simple examples or episodes taken from modern physics. The bulk of the readings will come from two textbooks (available at the Barnes & Nobel University Bookstore) and articles in journals. PREREQUISITES: The course is entirely self-contained: all topics in physics that are necessary for understanding the pertinent philosophical problems will be reviewed in class.
                                                MAJORS ONLY
                                                PHIL 362-401 KANT'S CRITICAL PROJECT HAHMANN, ANDREE MCNEIL BUILDING 309 TR 0300PM-0430PM This seminar is dedicated to Kant's critical philosophy. In particular, the Critique of Pure Reason, which is the first of three Critiques, ranks amongst the most important texts of modern philosophy. Even in contemporary debates, Kantian claims still play a crucial role and basic knowledge of Kant's critical philosophy is often assumed. In this seminar, we will deal with central passages from different works which, taken together, give a good picture of Kant's critical revision of classical metapjhysics. We shall discuss important conceptions and ideas of Kant's mature philosophy, such as the nature of transcendental aesthetics and the resulting distinction between a think-in-itself and appearance, the meaning and applicaiton of the categorires, the justification and determination of human freedom, and the role of the moral law for Kant's so-called practical metaphysics. This seminar is dedicated to Kant's critical philosophy. In particular, the Critique of Pure Reason, which is the first of three Critiques, ranks amongst the most important texts of modern philosophy. Even in contemporary debates, Kantian claims still play a crucial role and basic knowledge of Kant's critical philosophy is often assumed. In this seminar, we will deal with central passages from different works which, taken together, give a good picture of Kant's critical revision of classical metaphysics. We shall discuss important conceptions and ideas of Kant's mature philosophy, such as the nature of transcendental aesthetics and the resulting distinction between a thing-in-itself and appearance, the meaning and application of the categories, the justification and determination of human freedom, and the role of the moral law for Kant's so-called practical metaphysics.
                                                  MAJORS ONLY
                                                  PHIL 410-401 INTRODUCTION TO LOGIC & COMPUTABILITY WEINSTEIN, SCOTT TOWNE BUILDING 321 TR 0900AM-1030AM Propositional logic: semantics, formal deductions, resolution method. First order logic: validity, models, formal deductions; Godel's completeness theorem, Lowenheim-Skolem theorem: cut-elimination, Herbrand's theorem, resolution method. Computability: finite automata, Turing machines, Godel's incompleteness theorems. Algorithmically unsolvable problems in mathematics.
                                                    PHIL 412-401 TOPICS IN LOGIC WEINSTEIN, SCOTT
                                                    TANNEN, VAL
                                                    FISHER-BENNETT HALL 139 TR 0300PM-0430PM This course will examine the expressive power of various logical languages over the class of finite structures. The course beings with an exposition of some fundamental results about first-order logic in the context of finite structures and then proceeds to consider various extensions of first-order logic including fixed-point operators, generalized quantifiers, infinitary languages, and higher-order languages. The expressive power of these extensions will be studied in detail and connections with the theory of computational complexity and with combinatorics will be explored.
                                                      PHIL 448-401 19TH C PHIL: SCHOPENHAUER & NIETZSCHE HORSTMANN, ROLF CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 493 TR 1200PM-0130PM The aim of the course is to discuss major elements of Schopenhauer's and Nietzsche's philosophy, espcially their epistemological and aesthetic teachings and their relation to other philosophers in the 18th and 19th century. Texts will include Schopenhauer's The World as Will and Representation, Nietzsche's The Birth of Tragedy; Human, All Too Human; Beyond Good and Evil. The aim of the course is to discuss major elements of Schopenhauer's and Nietzsche's philosophy, especially their epistemological and aesthetic teachings and their relation to other philosophers in the 18th and 195h century. Texts will include Schopenhauer's The World as Will and Representation, Nietzsche's The Birth of Tragedy; Human, All Too Human; Beyond Good and Evil.
                                                        PHIL 479-301 MODERN POLITICAL PHIL FREEMAN, SAMUEL CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 493 MW 0330PM-0500PM A survey of several works in modern political philosophy, including Thomas Hobbes's, Leviathan; John Locke's, Second Treatise on Government and Letter Concerning Toleration; David Hume's 'Of the Original Contract' and 'On Justice'; John Stuart Mill's Utilitarianism, On Liberty, and The Subjection of Women; excerpts from Karl Marx's Capital and other writings; and John Rawls's A Theory of Justice.
                                                          PHIL 489-640 Conflict, Ideology, and Public Discourse STEINBERG, STEPHEN CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 203 W 0600PM-0840PM Contemporary public discourse -- in politics, in the media, on the Internet, and throughout our culture -- gives expression to intense, sometimes violent, disagreements and conflicts that often frustrate the solution of important public policy questions, curtail productive public deliberation and dialogue, and profoundly challenge our leaders and institutions. This course will deepen our understanding of the role that political and cultural ideologies -- such as liberalism, conservatism, nationalism, totalitarianism, fundamentalism, etc. -- play in these conflicts and the psychology of ideological thinking that makes them so difficult to resolve. We will begin by considering a series of case studies in contemporary political, social and cultural conflict, drawn from contemporary events such as the 2012 political campaigns, the 2011 debt ceiling debate in Congress, nationalist movements around the globe, etc. We will identify and examine the ideologies driving such conflicts, and from these we will draw out the common philosophical characteristics and psychological features of ideological thinking. Throughout, we will seek to understand the deep attraction of ideological commitments and why they tend to push public discourse and behavior to extremes and even violence. Finally, we will consider efforts to reduce or resolve ideological conflicts thorugh strategies of political compromise, dialogue, toleration, and democratic deliberation. We live in a divided country and a divided world. Contemporary discourse -- in politics and international relations, in the media and online, and throughout our national and global cultures -- gives expression to intense, sometimes violent, disagreements and conflicts that often obstruct the solution of important public policy questions, frustrate organizational objectives, and profoundly challenge our leaders and institutions. This seminar course will explore the role of political, economic, and social ideologies in these conflicts and why this makes them so difficult to resolve. We will consider a variety of contemporary conflicts and ideologies and attempt to draw out some of their common philosophical and psychological characteristics, as well as explore possible strategies for reducing or resolving such conflicts. Throughout we will seek to understand the deep attraction of ideological commitments and why ideologies tend to push discourse and behavior to extremes and even violence.
                                                            PHIL 525-301 TOPICS PHIL SCI WEISBERG, MICHAEL CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 493 M 1200PM-0300PM For the last four centuries, scientific research has provided our most reliable understanding of the world. Although the scientific revolution started modestly with attempts to understand stellar movement, we now know the age and constitution of the universe, the basis of heredity, and we can make and break chemical bonds at will. By all appearances, science seems to have made substantial progress from the scientific revolution to the global scientific enterprise of the 21st centry. This course is about how science has generated this knowledge, and whether it has been as progressive and reliable as it seems. We will consider methodological issues such as the sources of scientific knowledge, objectivity, the growing importance of computation in the natural sciences, and the nature of modeling. We will examine products of scientific research: explanations, models, theories, and laws of nature. And we will discuss questions about science and values, including whether non-scientific values can and should enter scientific research, the relationship between science and religion, and the role of the public in guiding the scientific enterprise.
                                                              UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                              PHIL 525-640 MLA Proseminar: Science, Truth, and Democracy WEISBERG, MICHAEL CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 493 W 0500PM-0740PM For the last four centuries, scientific research has provided our most reliable understanding of the world. Although the scientific revolution started modestly with attempts to understand stellar movement, we now know the age and constitution of the universe, the basis of heredity, and we can make and break chemical bonds at will. By all appearances, science seems to have made substantial progress from the scientific revolution to the global scientific enterprise of the 21st centry. This course is about how science has generated this knowledge, and whether it has been as progressive and reliable as it seems. We will consider methodological issues such as the sources of scientific knowledge, objectivity, the growing importance of computation in the natural sciences, and the nature of modeling. We will examine products of scientific research: explanations, models, theories, and laws of nature. And we will discuss questions about science and values, including whether non-scientific values can and should enter scientific research, the relationship between science and religion, and the role of the public in guiding the scientific enterprise.
                                                                PHIL 526-401 PHILOSOPHY OF PSYCHOLOGY: MIND IN NATURE HATFIELD, GARY CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 493 R 0300PM-0600PM Where is mind to be found in nature? Is it revealed by end-driven behavior, by mental contents, by the ability to perceive an external environment? This seminar will consider these and related questions as they arise in selected spisodes from the history of philosophy and in contemporary discussions of the evolution of minds, brains, and behavior Where is mind to be found in nature? Is it revealed by end-driven behavior, by mental contents, by the ability to perceive an external environment? This seminar will consider these and related questions as they arise in selected episodes from the history of philosophy and in contemporary discussions of the evolution of minds, brains, and behavior.
                                                                  UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                  PHIL 532-301 TOPICS IN EPISTEMOLOGY SINGER, DANIEL MEYERSON HALL B5 M 0300PM-0600PM This is a graduate seminar intended for graduate students in Philosophy. It will cover some topics of interest to contemporary epistemologists, at the discretion of the instructor. Possible topics may include skepticism, accounts of knowledge and justification, virtue epistemology, formal epistemology, social epistemology, feminist epistemology, meta-epistemology and epistemic normativity. This is a graduate seminar intended for graduate students in Philosophy. It will cover some topics of interest to contemporary epistemologists, at the discretion of the instructor. Possible topics may include skepticism, accounts of knowledge and justification, virtue epistemology, formal epistemology, social epistemology, feminist epistemology, meta-epistemology, and epistemic normativity.
                                                                    UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                    PHIL 551-401 KANT'S PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION CHIGNELL, ANDREW CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 493 T 0300PM-0600PM A seminar on Kant's religious thought in the context of his metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and philosophy of history. Topics include: theistic arguments; non-classical conceptinos of God; radical evil; grace, forgiveness, and moral revolution; belief, faith, and hope; rational approaches to scripture and miracles; the threat of counterfeit service and priestcraft; religous community versus ethical community; the prospects for moral progress. Primary readings come from the pre-critical period, the Critiques, Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone, and various lectures and secondary sources. Some prevous formal study of modern philosophy (17th-19th century) or Kant is recommended as preparation. A seminar on Kant's religious thought in the context of his metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, and philosophy of history. Topics include: theistic arguments; non-classical conceptions of God; radical evil; grace, forgiveness, and moral revolution; belief, faith, and hope; rational approaches to scripture and miracles; the threat of counterfeit service and priestcraft; religious community versus ethical community; the prospects for moral progress. Primary readings come from the pre-critical period, the critiques, Religion within the Limits of Reason Alone, and various lectures. Some previous formal study of modern philosophy (17th-19th century) or Kant is required as preparation.
                                                                      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                      PHIL 600-301 PROSEMINAR SPENCER, QUAYSHAWN CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 237 TR 0130PM-0300PM An intensive seminar for first-year doctoral students, with readings drawn from recent and contemporary eistemology and metaphysics, broadly construed. Students will develop their abilities to present and discuss philosophical texts, and to write and revise their own papers.
                                                                        PHIL 601-001 PHILOSOPHY CONSORTIUM FREEMAN, SAMUEL TBA TBA- For graduate students taking courses at other institutions belonging to the Philadelphia area Philosophical Consortium.
                                                                          PHIL 612-301 Stoic Ethics and Psychology MEYER, SUSAN MEYERSON HALL B5 M 1200PM-0300PM The ancient Stoics famously rejected the tripartite psychology of Plato and the Aristotelian division of the psyche into rational and non-rational parts. Everything we think, say, feel, and do is an exercise of reason, specifically, an assent to an impression. This includes the pathe--emotions such as fear, anger, and pity and love. According to the Stoic doctrine of apatheia, we should eradicate the pathe from our lives. But there are some emotions of which the Stoics approve: the so-called "good feelings" (eupatheiai) which include joy, reverence, and goodwill. We will examine the difference between the pathe and the eupatheiai in the context of their Stoic doctrine of "impulse" (horme), and of their ethical theory more generally. All texts will be read in translation, and will include selections from: Cicero: Tusculan Disputations, On Ends, On Duties, Epicctetus: Discourses, Seneca: Letters, Stobaeus: Eclogues, Galen: On the Doctrines of Hippocrates and Plato. The ancient Stoics famously rejected the tripartite psychology of Plato and the Aristotelian division of the psyche into rational and non-rational parts. Everything we think, say, feel, and do is an exercise of reason, specifically, an assent to an impression. This includes the pathe--emotions such as fear, anger, and pity and love. According to the Stoic doctrine of apatheia, we should eradicate the pathe from our lives. But there are some emotions of which the Stoics approve: the so-called "good feelings" (eupatheiai) which include joy, reverence, and goodwill. We will examine the difference between the pathe and the eupatheiai in the context of their Stoic doctrine of "impulse" (horme), and of their ethical theory more generally. All texts will be read in translation, and will include selections from: Cicero: Tusculan Disputations, On Ends, On Duties, Epictetus: Discourses, Seneca: Letters, Stobaeus: Eclogues, Galen: On the Doctrines of Hippocrates and Plato
                                                                            PHIL 700-301 DISSERTATION WORKSHOP SINGER, DANIEL CLAUDIA COHEN HALL 493 TR 0130PM-0300PM Registration required for all third-year doctoral students. Fourth year students and beyond attend and present their work in the Dissertation Seminar. From time to time, topics pertaining to professional development and dissertation writing will be discussed.
                                                                              FOR PHD STUDENTS ONLY