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Courses for Spring 2019

Title Instructor Location Time All taxonomy terms Description Section Description Cross Listings Fulfills Registration Notes Syllabus Syllabus URL Course Syllabus URL
PHIL 001-001 INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY SINGER, DANIEL MW 1000AM-1100AM Philosophers ask difficult questions about the most basic issues in human life. Does God exist? What can we know about the world? What does it mean to have a mind? How should I treat non-human animals? Do I have free will? This course is an introduction to some of these questions and to the methods philosophers have developed for thinking clearly about them.
    Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
    PHIL 001-601 INTRO TO PHILOSOPHY Philosophers ask difficult questions about the most basic issues in human life. Does God exist? What can we know about the world? What does it mean to have a mind? How should I treat non-human animals? Do I have free will? This course is an introduction to some of these questions and to the methods philosophers have developed for thinking clearly about them.
      Hum & Soc Sci Sector (new curriculum only) HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCE SECTOR
      PHIL 002-001 INTRO TO ETHICS PEREIRA DI SALVO, CARLOS MW 1000AM-1100AM Ethics is the study of right and wrong behavior. This introductory course will introduce students to major ethical theories, the possible sources of normativity, and specific ethical problems and questions. Topics may include euthanasia, abortion, animal rights, the family, sexuality, bioethics, crime and punishment and war.
        Society sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; SOCIETY SECTOR
        PHIL 002-301 INTRO TO ETHICS BAKER, TODD TR 1030AM-1200PM Ethics is the study of right and wrong behavior. This introductory course will introduce students to major ethical theories, the possible sources of normativity, and specific ethical problems and questions. Topics may include euthanasia, abortion, animal rights, the family, sexuality, bioethics, crime and punishment and war.
          Society sector (all classes) SOCIETY SECTOR
          PHIL 002-601 INTRO TO ETHICS CASTELLITTO, PAUL R 0600PM-0900PM Ethics is the study of right and wrong behavior. This introductory course will introduce students to major ethical theories, the possible sources of normativity, and specific ethical problems and questions. Topics may include euthanasia, abortion, animal rights, the family, sexuality, bioethics, crime and punishment and war.
            Society sector (all classes) SOCIETY SECTOR
            PHIL 003-601 HIST ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY MW 0430PM-0600PM "What is philosophy? How does it differ from science, religion, literature, and other modes of human discourse? This course traces the origins of philosophy as a discipline in the Western tradition, looking to thinkers of Ancient Greece and Rome. We will examine how natural philosophers such as Thales, Anaximander, and Heraclitus distinguished their inquiries from the teachings of poets such as Homer and Hesiod; how ancient atomism had its origins in a response to Parmenides' challenge to the assumption that things change in the world; how Socrates reoriented the focus of philosophy away from the natural world and toward the fundamental ethical question, how shall I live? We will also examine how his pupil, Plato, and subsequently Aristotle, developed elaborate philosophical systems that address the nature of reality, knowledge, and human happiness. Finally, we will examine the ways in which later thinkers such as the Epicureans and Stoics transformed and extended the earlier tradition."
              History & Tradition Sector (all classes) HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR
              PHIL 004-401 HISTORY OF MODERN PHILOS HUMPHREYS, JUSTIN TR 1200PM-0100PM This course is an introduction to a few central themes in philosophy in the 17th and 18th centuries, and to some of the crucial thinkers who addressed those themes. Topics to be covered may include, among others, the nature of the human being (including the human mind), the relationship between God and the created world, the nature of freedom, and the relations among natural sciences, philosophy and theology in this rich period of human history.
                History & Tradition Sector (all classes) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; HISTORY & TRADITION SECTOR
                PHIL 005-401 FORMAL LOGIC I WEINSTEIN, SCOTT MWF 1000AM-1100AM This course provides an introduction to some of the fundamental ideas of logic. Topics will include truth functional logic, quantificational logic, and logical decision problems.
                  FORMAL REASONING COURSE; FORMAL REASONING
                  PHIL 008-601 THE SOCIAL CONTRACT R 0630PM-0930PM This is a critical survey of the history of western modern political philosophy, beginning from the Early Modern period and concluding with the 19th or 20th Century. Our study typically begins with Hobbes and ends with Mill or Rawls. The organizing theme of our inventigation will be the idea of the Social Contract. We will examine different contract theories as well as criticisms and proposed alternatives to the contract idea, such as utilitarianism. Besides the above, examples of authors we will read are Locke, Rousseau, Hume, Mill and Marx.
                    Society sector (all classes) SOCIETY SECTOR
                    PHIL 025-001 PHILOS OF SCIENCE WEISBERG, MICHAEL MW 1200PM-0100PM What counts as a scientific theory? What counts as evidence for a scientific theory? Are scientific inferences justified? Does science give us truths or approximate truths about a world that exists independently of us? How can we know? Does it matter? These are all perennial questions in the philosophy of science, and the goal of this course is to look at how philosophers have answered these questions since the scientific revolution. In addition to reading classic work by philosophers of science, we will read material from living and dead scientists in order to gain a deeper appreciation of the philosophical questions that have troubled the most brilliant scientists in Western science.
                      Nat Sci & Math Sector (new curriculum only) SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED; NATURAL SCIENCE & MATH SECTOR
                      PHIL 026-301 PHIL OF SPACE & TIME SKILLINGS, DEREK MW 0100PM-0200PM This course provides an introduction to the philosophy and intellectual history of space-time and cosmological models from ancient to modern times with special emphasis on paradigm shifts, leading to Einstein's theories of special and general relativity and cosmology. Other topics include Big Bang, black holes stellar structure, the metaphysics of substance, particles, fields, and superstrings, unification and grand unification of modern physical theories. No philosophy of physics background is presupposed.
                        Nat Sci & Math Sector (new curriculum only)
                        PHIL 029-601 PHILOSOPHY OF SPORT MEYER, MILTON W 0600PM-0900PM This is an introductory philosophy course that uses philosophical tools to understand and answer questions that arise in and about sports. Is there a principled basis for determining which methods of performance enhancement are acceptable? Developing a framework to answer this question will take us through: 1) questions about rules: what is their point in sports and what are appropriate reasons to change them; 2) questions about the point of participation in a sport; 3) questions about the kinds of virtues sports participants can demonstrate; and 4) questions about integrity of participants and a sport itself. A related set of questions concerns the appropriate competitors in sporting events: Should competition be restricted to single sex categories; Should competition be divided into disabled and non-disabled categories?
                          PHIL 030-401 PLATO: DEMCY & PWER RHET REESE, BRIAN MW 0200PM-0330PM If you aspired to a political career in ancient Athens, public speaking was an essential skill. Athens was a direct democracy, which meant that having the ability to win over your fellow citizens was tantamount to political success. Young, ambitious citizens would therefore pay handsomely to study with rhetoricians, who professed to teach this all-important skill. Plato, however, was famously wary of the power of rhetoric. In this class, we will read selections from Plato's dialogues in which many of the most prominent rhetoricians are engaged in discussion with Socrates about the nature of rhetoric, as well as its potential benefits and pitfalls. Students will then assume the role of citizens charged with speaking before the Athenian Assembly on various subjects. This will likely include a recreation of the trial of Socrates, who was himself accused of using rhetoric to make the weaker argument the stronger. By examining democracy at its threshold, and the power wielded by rhetoricians within a democracy, this CWiC seminar aims to provide both the context and the perspective to consider its later evolution. Grades will be based on at least two oral presentations, as well as general participation in other classroom activities.
                            PHIL 034-601 PHILOSOPHY OF RELIGION STEINBERG, STEPHEN T 0600PM-0900PM An introductory philosophical examination of questions regarding the nature of religious experiences and beliefs; arguments for and against the existence of God; the problem of evil; the relationships of faith, reason and science, the possibility of religious knowledge, the role of religious communities, etc. Readings from the history of philosophy, 20th century and contemporary philosophy.
                              PHIL 074-301 BUSINESS ETHICS CETTY, CHETAN TR 0430PM-0630PM We will examine practical ethical issues facing businesses, and the philosophical tools for addressing them. Topics may include corporate responsibility, shareholders vs. stakeholders, whistle blowing, raiding and restructuring, the morality of markets, fair hiring practices, workers rights, sexual harassment, environmental impact.
                                PHIL 079-301 ENVIRONMENTAL ETHICS SKILLINGS, DEREK MW 0330PM-0500PM In this course we will investigate some of the ethical issues that arise from our relationship with the environment. Topics may include : What are our responsibilities toward the environment, as individuals and as members of institutions? How do our responsibilities toward the environment relate to other ethical considerations? Do non-human animals/species/ecosystems have intrinsic value? What should conservationists conserve?
                                  PHIL 080-301 AESTHETICS LORD, ERROL TR 0130PM-0300PM This course examines philosophical issues centering on the nature and value of the arts. Some questions we'll consider are: What is art? What does it mean to have an aesthetic experience? How are aesthetic experiences different from non-aesthetic ones? What is the relation between art and truth? How do the moral qualities in a work of art affect its aesthetic qualities? Why are emotions important in our interpretations of artworks? What is the relation between art and expression? Do forgeries necessarily have less aesthetic value than original artworks? What are aesthetic judgments, and are they merely expressions of taste? Lecture and discussion will center on both classical and contemporary works in aesthetics.
                                    Arts & Letters Sector (all classes) ARTS & LETTERS SECTOR
                                    PHIL 228-401 PHIL OF SOCIAL SCIENCE MW 0100PM-0200PM This course is about the foundations of contemporary social science. It focuses on the nature of social systems, the similarities and differences between social and natural sciences, the construction, analysis, and confirmation of social theories, and the nature of social explanations. Specific topics may include: What are social norms and conventions? What does it mean to have one gender rather than another, or one sexual orientation rather than another? Should social systems be studied quantitatively or qualitatively?
                                      PHIL 244-401 PHILOSOPHY OF MIND GOMEZ-LAVIN, JAVIER TR 1200PM-0100PM This course will survey several central topics in philosophy of mind, as well as investigating how philosopy of the mind interacts with scientific study of the mind. Among the questions we'll be asking are: What is it to have a mind? What is the relationship between the mind and the brain? Can there be a science of the mind? What can it tell us? What can philosophy contribute to a science of the mind? What is consciousness? What is it to think, to perceive, to act? How are perception, thought, and action related to one another?
                                        SECTION ACTIVITY CO-REQUISITE REQUIRED
                                        PHIL 279-301 MARKETS,MORALITY&CAPITAL TAN, KOK-CHOR TR 1030AM-1200PM This course will examine contemporary theories of justice, including libertarianism, liberalism, contemporary Marxism and feminism. Examples of topics we will examine are distributive justice, liberty, human rights, republicanism, and global justice. Philosophers we will read include John Rawls, Ronald Dworkin, Robert Nozick, Michael Walzer, Martha Nussbaum, Susan Moller Okin, and G.A. Cohen.
                                          PHIL 325-301 TOPICS IN PHIL OF SCI WEINSTEIN, SCOTT MW 0200PM-0330PM The aim of this course is to explore the relationships between philosophy and physics, with a focus on prominent foundational issues in modern physics. The course is organized around four main areas. In the first part, we focus on the philosophy and (classical and relativistic) structure of space and time, including the proliferations of physical geometries (Lobachevskian and Riemannian) ofcurved space time. Are space and time real? If so, what kind of entities are they? Metaphysically, we have a choice between presentism and eternalism, and regarding the nature of physical objects in space-tme, there is a choice between endurantism and perdurantism. Is time travel possible? In the second part, we concentrate on the basic metaphysical and epistemological questions posed by physics: causality, determinism, randomnes, and the nature of physical laws. How is cause conveyed from one physical body to another? Are the laws of physics true? In the third part, we turn to the principal philosophical issues raised by quantum physics: structural realism and the interpretations of quantum mechanics, non-locality and Bell's theorem, the infamous Schrodinger cat paradox, hidden variables, and quantum measurement. What is primary -- particles or waves? Finally in the fourth part, we investigate the metaphysics underlying Big Bang and Ekpyrotic cosmological theories, and evidence for a parallel universe and baby universes. All these philosophical issues will be addressed by looking at some simple examples or episodes taken from modern physics. The bulk of the readings will come from two textbooks (available at the Barnes & Nobel University Bookstore) and articles in journals. PREREQUISTITES: The course is entirely self-contained: All topics in physics that are necessary for understanding the pertinent philosophical problems will be reviewed in class.
                                            PHIL 362-301 TOPICS EARLY MODERN PHIL DETLEFSEN, KAREN CANCELED A study of selected topics, texts, and figures from 17th and 18th century European philosophy. Figures studied may include Descartes, Leibniz,Locke, Berkley, Hume, or Kant. Topics will vary from term to term.
                                              MAJORS ONLY
                                              PHIL 372-301 TOPICS IN ETHICS MEYER, SUSAN TR 1200PM-0130PM This majors seminar will cover selected topics in ethics. The content will vary from semester to semester.
                                                PHIL 412-401 TOPICS IN LOGIC TOWSNER, HENRY TR 1030AM-1200PM The course focuses topics drawn from the central areas of mathematical logic: model theory, proof theory, set theory, and computability theory.
                                                  PHIL 425-401 PHIL OF SCIENCE WEISBERG, MICHAEL An advanced introduction to the central philosophical questions concerning the nature of scientific knowledge and its relation to experience, and the metaphysical assumptions underlying the natural sciences. Topics to be covered include: science versus pseudoscience, laws of nature, causation, determinism and randomness, theories and models in science, scientific explanation, underdetermination of theories by observation and measurement, realism and antirealism, reductionism and intertheory relations, objectivity and value judgments in science, hypothesis testing and confirmation of scientific theories, and classical paradoxes in scientific methodology.
                                                    PHIL 436-301 HELLENISTIC PHILOSOPHY HAHMANN, ANDREE TR 1200PM-0130PM A survey of the natural philosophy, ethics, and epistemology of the three major schools of post-Aristotelian philosophy in the West in the period up to approximately 200 CE: the Stoics, the Epicureans, the Academic Sceptics, and the "Pyrrhonists". Authors to be read include Cicero, Seneca, Lucreetius, Sextus Empiricus, and Stobaeus. All texts will be read in English translation. No Latin or Greek is required.
                                                      PHIL 466-401 KANT II PEREIRA DI SALVO, CARLOS MW 0200PM-0330PM This course is a study of Kant's moral and political philosophy. Texts may include Kant's Lectures on Ethics, Groundwork for the Metaphysics of Morals, Critique of Practical Reason, Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason, and Metaphysics of Morals.
                                                        PHIL 472-301 SURVEY OF ETHICAL THEORY LORD, ERROL T 1030AM-1200PM This course is an investigation of the main questions and problems in metaethics since the turn of the 20th century. We will investigate questions about the metaphysics of morality, the philosophy of language of moral talk, the philosophy of mind of moral thought, the epistemology of morality, and the objectivity of morality.
                                                          PHIL 505-401 FORMAL LOGIC I WEINSTEIN, SCOTT MWF 1000AM-1100AM This course provides an introduction to some of the fundamental ideas of logic. Topics will include truth functional logic, quantificational logic, and logical decision problems.
                                                            FORMAL REASONING COURSE; UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION; FORMAL REASONING
                                                            PHIL 526-401 Appearances from Descartes to Chisholm HATFIELD, GARY R 0300PM-0600PM More than a century after Sigmund Freud transformed -- for better or worse -- our understanding of what it means to be human, Freudian psychoanalysis still exerts a profound influence in our culture. This seminar course is an exploration of the philosophical issues raised by Freudian psychoanalysis as a theory of mind and culture. After a close reading of Freud's theoretical writings on the nature of the mind and human behavior, we will explore why Freud s theories -- despite more than a century of criticism remain highly influential as a framework for the interpretation of art, literature, religion, society, politics, and history. Readings from Freud's "meta-psychological," cultural, and social writings, Paul Ricoeur's Freud and Philosophy, and other contemporary authors in philosophy, psychoanalysis, and other fields.
                                                              PHIL 532-301 TOPICS IN EPISTEMOLOGY SINGER, DANIEL M 0330PM-0630PM This seminar will cover topics of interest to contemporary epistemologists. Possible topics may include skepticism, accounts of knowledge and justification, virtue epistemology, formal epistemology, social epistemology, feminist epistemology, meta-epistemology and epistemic normativity.
                                                                PHIL 547-301 TOPICS EARLY MODERN PHIL DETLEFSEN, KAREN W 0330PM-0630PM This course focuses on topics in philosophy of the 17-18th centuries. Topics may include natural philosophy in the early modern period, the relation of metaphysics to the 'sciences' (including what is meant by "metaphysics", and what falls under the scope of the various sciences), and the special role played by the life sciences. An examination of the development of a few topics in natural philosophy in the early modern period, such as: method (the evolution of hypotheses and their reception, the relation of theory to empirical work, and the importance of different kinds of empirical work, e.e. observation, experiment, use of instruments); the relation of metaphysics to the 'sciences' (including what is meant by "metaphysics", and what falls under the scope of the various sciences); and the special role played by the life sciences. A study of various social, political, and ethical issues, including the role that women played in these issues, and the nascent forms of feminism that emerged in the early modern era.
                                                                  PHIL 551-301 The Religious Background of Radical Enlightenment in Europe R 0300PM-0600PM 125 A seminar in philosophy of the early modern period (roughly 1600-1800), covering specific figures and/or topics. Examples of figures studied include (but are not limited to) Descartes Cavendish, Astell, Locke, Hume, Du Chatelet,or Kant. Examples of topics studied include (but again are not limited to)substance, causation, freedom, natural philosophy,education, the human being,the private and the public, or political authority.
                                                                    PHIL 576-401 Political Authority and Political Obligation (Perry) PERRY, STEPHEN W 0430PM-0630PM This class will be dedicated to investigating topics related to rationality in its many forms. Potential areas of study are metaethics, epistemology, moral psychology, and the philosophies of mind, language and action. UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION.
                                                                      UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                      PHIL 577-401 Law and Morality of War (Finkelstein) FINKELSTEIN, CLAIRE R 0430PM-0630PM This seminar will examine leading academic theories of constitutional interpretation, starting with classic texts by (for illustration) Thayer, Wechsler, Ely, Bobbitt, Dworkin, and Scalia, and emphasizing current debates within originalism and between originalists and their critics. While the focus will be on American constitutional interpretation, we will also see how that literature is currently running up against, and possibly contributing to, more "philosophical" or "jurisprudential" accounts of the contents of law. Consistent with the nature of the material, the reading load is likely to be somewhat heavier and more demanding than in the average seminar. Students will be expected to read the assigned material carefully and to participate actively in class discussions; they will have the option of submitting either a single research paper or several shorter papers.
                                                                        UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION
                                                                        PHIL 578-301 TOPICS IN POLITICAL PHIL TAN, KOK-CHOR T 0130PM-0430PM This is a topics-based graduate seminar in political philosophy. Examples of topics we can examine in this course include distributive justice, liberty, equality, and global justice. Course readings will be drawn from a combination of seminal and more recent works on the selected topics.
                                                                          UNDERGRADUATES NEED PERMISSION